Direct Labor Efficiency Variance

The direct labor efficiency variance is one of the main standard costing variances, and results from the difference between the standard quantity and the actual quantity of labor used by a business during production. The variance is sometimes referred to as the direct labor usage variance or the direct labor quantity variance.

The variance is calculated using the direct labor efficiency variance formula, which takes the difference between the standard quantity and the actual quantity of labor used, and multiplies this by the standard price per unit of labor, often referred to as the standard rate.

Direct labor efficiency variance = (Standard quantity – Actual quantity) x Standard rate

Example of Direct Labor Efficiency Variance

Suppose, for example, a manufacturer sets the standard labor rate at 15.00 per hour, and the standard quantity of labor needed to manufacture one item at 0.50 hours.

On a production run, they manufacture 500 items and find they have used 230 hours of labor. The direct labor efficiency variance is given as follows:

Direct labor efficiency variance = (Standard quantity – Actual quantity) x Standard rate.
Direct labor efficiency variance = (500 x 0.50 – 230) x 15.00
Direct labor efficiency variance = 300

This is summarized in the table below:

Direct labor efficiency variance summary
Items Labor/Item Quantity Rate Cost
Standard 500 0.50 250 15.00 3,750
Actual 500 230 15.00 3,450
Efficiency variance 20 15.00 300

In this example, the direct labor efficiency variance is positive (favorable), as the actual amount of labor used (230) was less than the standard amount of labor (250), and therefore it cost the business less to produce the 500 items for than it should have done. This variance would be posted as a credit to the direct labor efficiency variance account. Full details of the journal entry required to post the variance, standard cost and actual cost can be found in our direct labor variance journal tutorial.

Clearing the Direct Labor Efficiency Variance Account

The financial statements of the business must ultimately show the actual costs incurred by the business, and at the end of an accounting period, having investigated the direct labor efficiency variances using the variance report, the balance on the direct labor efficiency variance account needs to be cleared using the rules discussed in our standard costing and variance analysis tutorial and are available for download in PDF format here. These rules can be summarized as follows:

  1. For small, insignificant direct labor efficiency variances it is not worth the time and effort apportioning the balance, so it is simply transferred to the cost of goods sold account.
  2. Larger unfavorable variances (debit balances) which have resulted from errors and inefficiencies in the business, are also transferred to the cost of goods sold account, as apportioning them to an inventory account would incorrectly increase the value of the inventory.
  3. All other significant direct labor efficiency variances (debit or credit balances) are split between inventory accounts and the cost of goods sold account in proportion to the amount of standard labor cost remaining on that account.

Variance Apportionment Example

In the example used above the direct labor efficiency variance was favorable leaving a credit balance of 300 on the variance account. Assume for simplicity that this was the only direct labor efficiency variance for the year.

If the balance is considered insignificant in relation to the size of the business, then it can simply be transferred to the cost of goods sold account.

Insignificant balance on direct labor efficiency variance account
Account Debit Credit
Direct labor efficiency variance 300
Cost of goods sold 300
Total 300 300

If however, it is considered to be significant in relation to the size of the business, then the variance needs to be analyzed between the inventory accounts (work in process, and finished goods) and the cost of goods sold account.

Suppose for example, 40% of the standard labor cost remained in the work in process inventory, and 60% had been used in production and the items sold, then the direct labor efficiency variance account balance needs to be split as follows:

Apportioning the direct labor efficiency variance account balance
Account Percentage Amount
Work in process inventory 40% 120
Cost of goods sold 60% 180
Total 100% 300

And the bookkeeping journal to post the transaction to clear the direct labor variance account would be as follows:

Significant balance on direct labor efficiency variance account
Account Debit Credit
Direct labor efficiency variance 300
Work in process inventory inventory 120
Cost of goods sold account 180
Total 300 300

The credit balance on the direct labor efficiency variance account (300) has now been split between the work in process inventory account (120), and the cost of goods sold account (180), reducing both accounts by the appropriate amount, and clearing the variance account balance.

Direct Labor Efficiency Variance November 6th, 2016Team

You May Also Like


Related pages


partnership accounting tutorialimp restpoc accountingasset bookkeepingdefine direct labor costblank ledger sheetsclosing entries in accountingwhy trial balance is preparedcvp equationaccounting spreadsheet templateirr ratio formulaunrealized gains and losses balance sheetfixed overhead absorption rateaccounting eqautionhorizontal analysis balance sheetpremium bond calculatorpetty cash in balance sheethow to calculate accrued expensescurrent liabilities ratio formulamulti step income statement examplesperforma of income statementpv of annuity due formulafuture value growing annuityinterview for accounts payable positiondividend receivable journal entryexamples of stockholders equitywhat does gaap stand foryear end closing entries examplesrevenue reversal definitionannuity factor formulawhat is journal voucher in accountingfreight consignmentcommon stock valuation formulahow to calculate pbitwhat is fob in accountingstockholders equity exampleendowment fund accountingexcel straight line depreciationgeneral entries of accounts payableunsecured loans in balance sheetimportance of contribution marginunpaid salaries adjusting entryhow do you calculate markupdebits and credits accountingcost sell margin calculatorcurrent liabilities definition in accountinggrowing annuitycredit voucher templateoperating asset turnover ratioaccount payable journal entriesmargin and markup calculator ukconsumables examplesnpv in accountingbank reconciliation statement notes pdflifo reserve adjustmentcalculate payback period onlinejournal entry for prepaid rent receivedtvm solver online calculatorexcel cash receipt templatecalculator present value of annuitymanufacturing overhead controlbank reconciliation nsf checkcompound depreciation calculatorrequisition slip samplebookkeeping contract agreementcost of capital calculation excelhow to calculate ending retained earningsvertical analysis accountingunearned revenue asset or liabilitybills receivable account formatbalance sheet worksheetaccounts receivable and allowance for doubtful accountspayback period formula for uneven cash flowaccounts payable reconciliation examplegross profit journal entryperpetual system journal entriespv of annuity calculatorjournal entry for salary receivedcalculation for payback period